Peter Salovey and John Mayer coined the term. It became more widely known through the psychologist, philosopher and journalist Daniel Goleman. With regard to a more simple definition, emotional education can be described as the ability to sense, understand, control and modify one’s own mood as well as that of others.

Through this Challenge, you will learn to work on emotional intelligence in a cross-curricular approach, taking advantage of the activities and proposals related to any specific curricular content. This is particularly for the performance of activities focused clearly on working with this type of emotional skill (as well as taking advantage of the opportunity to leverage them in order to work on other types of curricular content).

The following are some examples of types of activities you will learn to work on: identification activities; social skill development activities; active listening exercises; activities focused on emotional expression; and exercises that promote peaceful conflict resolution.

Emotional intelligence is a term coined by Peter Salovey and John Mayer (psychologists at Yale University). It became more widely known through the psychologist, philosopher and journalist Daniel Goleman. With regard to a more simple definition, emotional education can be described as the ability to sense, understand, control and modify one’s own mood as well as that of others.

Thus, according to Daniel Goleman, emotional intelligence allows us to be aware of our emotions; to understand other people’s feelings; to manage frustrating as well as pressure situations; to better our ability to work together; to adopt an empathetic, social attitude; and to participate in situations, reflect upon points of discussion and live together in a harmonious environment.

Through aiming to conceptualise emotional intelligence, we can also look at the theory of multiple intelligences of Howard Gardner, which mention interpersonal and intrapersonal intelligence. Through the promotion and development of these two types of intelligence, we can provide students with skills such as empathy, assertiveness, self-control, etc … that form parts of emotional intelligence.

Emotional intelligence is embodied in five practical skills:

  • Self-awareness.
  • Emotional Control.
  • Self-motivation (and the capability of motivating others).
  • Empathy
  • Social skills.

It is important during the educational proposals and progression design period, to keep in mind the importance of adding some objectives related to emotional intelligence, such as the following:

  • To facilitate the feeling of free expression.
  • To establish balanced, supportive, constructive relationships among students.
  • To encourage the development of the following communication skills: active listening, expression of feelings and assertiveness.
  • To collaborate in planning and conducting group activities.
  • To examine one’s own effort and resolve.
  • To identify and control emotions.

This Challenge will activate Teaching Skills in:

LEARNING PROCESSES

INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS

Developing the following abilities:

  • Empathy and effective communication
  • Self-esteem and self-concept