Placing the student at the centre of the learning process so that they can develop their skills through the resolution of real problems or situations, thereby connecting the achieved learning with its application in the real world.

Among the main benefits that this Challenge’s implementation brings to your classroom, the following are highlighted:

  • The structuring of knowledge for its use in real scenarios.
  • The development of efficient thought processes.
  • The development of self-regulated learning skills.
  • Motivation to learn.
  • The development of the ability to work as part of a group.

The methodology known as Problem-Based learning (or PBL, to use its acronym in English) began to be implemented at the faculty of medicine at McMaster University in Hamilton (Ontario, Canada) in 1960 by Howard Barrows and his collaboration team. Like other methodologies that demand active participation, the PBL places the student at the centre of the learning process so that they can develop their skills through solving problems in real life situations. In this way, the students connect the achieved learning with its application in the real world.

The basic learning materials used in the PBL methodology constitute descriptions of problems and a library of types of resources. The work process that is usually followed during the implementation of this methodology typically presents a wide range of variables, taking into account two main factors: the level of structure and complexity of the issues presented, and the degree to which tasks are managed by the teacher.

This Challenge will activate Teaching Skill in:

LEARNING PROCESSES

INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS

ORGANISATION AND PRESENTATION

THE CENTRE’S ACTIVITIES

Developing the following abilities:

  • Self-learning
  • Cognitive conflict and mental activation
  • Problem-Based Learning
  • Empathy and effective communication